Everything you’ve ever wanted to know about bone broth

July 23rd, 2018 by

I logged onto Instagram yesterday and counted no fewer than 10posts about bone broth; and being the gut health advocate that I am, felt all the feels and heart flutters you get when running into someone you love.

Here’s why I’m passionate about bone broth and why you will be to: Bone broth is an elixir of ultimate health*.  From sealing the gut, easing reactions to food intolerances, and boosting the immune system, bone broth has an impressive resume. I know you’re dying to get your hands on some more information, so buckle up and get ready for a ride towards a happier digestive system, as I answer your top FAQ’s about this miracle potion.

*Personal opinion and not a proper scientific claim

What makes bone broth “so healthy”?

Great question. We’re all used to the ‘next great health food’ cropping up in the news, but the why and the how behind the healthiness often gets lost in translation. Here’s what makes bone broth so healthy.

Bone broth is a tradition that extends all the way back to our primitive ancestors who caught onto the fact that there are parts of the animal which will only make their nutritional benefits available to us after several days, boiled down. Bones, skin, feet, and other assorted parts of the animal cannot be consumed directly, but they can be boiled! Today we know that the boiling process which results in bone broth simultaneously releases healing supplements like collagen, glutamine, and more.

Do I really need to be drinking bone broth?

In his most recent book, Eat Dirt, Dr. Axe discusses what he believes is a ‘leaky gut’ epidemic. Gut issues have been linked to all sorts of autoimmune diseases as well as food intolerances. Incorporating something as simple as a cup or two of bone broth into your diet each day helps to seal the gut lining and boost the immune system, which can aid in preventing ailing health.

Photo by Calee Shea

Where can I buy bone broth? 

There is no lack of companies that sell bone broth, and, depending on your location, local farmer’s market and butcher shops. That said, the most fiscally-friendly option is to make it yourself!

There is a bit of a process that includes scraping the top of the broth every few hours as the bones release minerals, so make sure you find a recipe that you like, and invest in a nice lead-free crockpot.

Warning: your kitchen will smell like boiled meat product for a few days, so apartment-dwellers beware. Just embrace that musky meat smell! It’s worth the trade-off. The things we do for health, right?

My bone broth looks all jiggly – Is this okay?

You’re killing it with the questions. You actually want your bone broth to be all jiggly! When you find your bone broth bustin’ out some moves, you know it is packed full of gelatin.

How do I eat bone broth?

There are all forms of bone broth in various cultures and cuisines which means the options are seemingly endless. I often drink it with a mixture of healing spices like turmeric, cumin, sea salt, pepper, and ginger in conjunction with a meal, but it also makes a wonderful base for stews, phos, gravy, and sauces. You can even steam your vegetables with bone broth as opposed to water.

I don’t like soups. What now?

You might want to try the bone broth protein powder! If dry powder mixes don’t do it for you, you can find bone broth in capsule form like any other vitamin. I recommend before making any purchases to that you do your research into where the bones are sourced. It’s the free range chicken principle. If you prefer your eggs to come from free range chickens, you’ll want your bone broth to come from the same.

If you have histamine related skin issues such as rosacea, rashes, or psoriasis, take note. 

If you find bone broth hasn’t worked for you in the past, don’t fret! It’s possible to have a reaction to the healthiest of foods, myself included. If you have high histamine levels in your body, a safe alternative to bone broth is stock. Stock is only cooked for a few hours rather than the days in which it takes to produce bone broth.

Highly fermented foods can also affect your body’s histamine levels – which is a sign of a gut issue – but a positive step towards healing your gut is to use stock and then try to work your way up to bone broth.

Whenever you begin to fold a new supplement into your diet, make sure to do your own research and run it by your doctor. Nutrition is not one-size-fits-all! Listen to your body and determine for yourself what works for you!